Race and Immigration (AFRICAAM 190, CSRE 189, SOC 289)

SOC
189
Instructors
Asad, A. (PI)
Rydzik, A. (TA)
Section Number
1
In the contemporary United States, supposedly race-neutral immigration laws have racially-unequal consequences. Immigrants from Mexico, Central America, and the Middle East are central to ongoing debates about who's includable, and who's excludable, from American society. These present-day dynamics mirror the historical forms of exclusion imposed on immigrants from places as diverse as China, Eastern Europe, Ireland, Italy, Japan, and much of Africa. These groups' varied experiences of exclusion underscore the long-time encoding of race into U.S. immigration policy and practice. Readings and discussions center on how immigration law has become racialized in its construction and in its enforcement over the last 150 years.
Grading
Letter or Credit/No Credit
Requirements
WAY-EDP, WAY-SI
Units
4-5
Undergraduate
Course Tags
Foundations
Contemporary Issues
Academic Year
Quarter
Winter
Section Days
Tuesday Thursday
Start Time
9:45 AM
End Time
11:15 AM
Location
260-113