International Law and International Relations

INTNLREL
140A
Instructors
Lutomski, P. (PI)
Section Number
1
International law, as a body of law, performs multiple, competing functions. It serves the interests, and seeks to limit the actions, of state actors. It is also a political rhetoric captured by the oppressed, and a foundation for activism and resistance. The purpose of this seminar is to illuminate this malleable nature of international law, to explain its foundational principles and sources, and to evaluate the contours of its role as law and discourse. Questions that will accompany us throughout this seminar include: What is the character of international legal rules? Do they matter in international politics? How effective are they? What potential and what limitations do they have? In addition to exploring such questions against the backdrop of theories of international relations, we will consider several topics which bring tensions between international law and international relations to the fore, such as use of force, human rights, and international criminal law.
Grading
Letter (ABCD/NP)
Requirements
WAY-SI
Units
5
Undergraduate
Course Tags
Foundations
Academic Year
Quarter
Winter
Section Days
Monday Wednesday
Start Time
11:30 AM
End Time
1:00 PM
Location
160-318